Everything Means Something: Pattern Analysis of Surveillance

            In the world of surveillance, conducting a pattern analysis on your client is the key to successfully predicting future movements. If you’ve conducted a lengthy pattern of life over time of your client and your client departs their residence every morning Monday through Friday at 8:00am, drives the same logical route, and arrives at their workplace between 8:25-8:30am, is it necessary to conduct a “do not lose” surveillance on them? Wouldn’t it be more logical and less compromising to conduct a “picket surveillance” along the known route and just let the client drive through the surveillance?

Remember, everything means something.

A picket surveillance is conducted by strategically places surveillance team members along a known route at key intersections or turning points. The “eye” position is setup to call out the client departing their residence and beginning the known route. From there, the rest of team maintains their positions and observes the client’s movement through their choke point. The final team member is setup to call the client into their known workplace.

This surveillance technique proves very successful in a less densely populated area or during hours of minimal traffic. We’ve all been there, picture yourself and your team in a residential area at 7:00am and the only movement is your client and the team. Conducting a “do not lose” surveillance in this situation will compromise your team rather quickly.

When conducting a pattern analysis after your surveillance shift, it is important to include a route analysis of the route driven by your client. The most effective technique is to draw out the route on an overlay sheet and archive it or use a more detailed mapping software if available. Use this collected raw data and compare it to other similar cases or crimes. Do other similar crimes or cases drive the same routes? After conducting surveillance long enough, you will lose your clients. It’s important to log where you lose your clients at. Do you lose them in similar areas? Do you lose other cases in the same area? After logging an extensive route analysis of your cases and comparing them to other team’s cases, do any other routes overlap? If similar cases are overlapping at a certain area, that area may be of interest for further surveillance. Are your clients using that area to shake surveillance? Are they going operational there? Could that intersection be a signal site? These are all topics and ideas to take into consideration when conducting a pattern analysis of your cases and comparing them to other cases.

Remember, everything means something.

 

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